Author: Katie Silver
Session: Poster

Background/context – The role of medical schools in nurturing human beings who go on to become Tomorrow’s Doctors (GMC 2009) is crucial and the methods employed to educate students is continually evolving. Increasingly, information technology is utilised to encourage and facilitate student learning. Medical students at Swansea University were already familiar with using Turning point clickers (interactive audience response system) due to using the clickers in anatomy quizzes previously. I decided to explore whether clicker quizzes could help students enhance their understanding if used in clinical forums as a summary to their learning weeks. What I did and why – After experiencing the benefits of quizzes in anatomy teaching I decided to produce a PowerPoint template that lecturers could fill in with their own questions and then students could use clickers to feedback their answers in a large group setting. Turning point allows quiz questions to be displayed and answers to be voted on by students using clickers with the subsequent voting patterns and correct answers made available. The template I made meant a quiz could be made using PowerPoint which is readily accessible, but opened in turning point at Swansea University and allow the users to have all the benefits turning point offers. What we found – Students from the 2011 (60) and 2012 (28) cohorts completed a survey about their experience of three interactive turning point quizzes produced from the template.
The results of the survey quantitative questions were as follows;
The quizzes helped students understand the lectures on a topic better;
81.83% strongly agreed or agreed. 7.96% strongly disagreed or disagreed.
The quizzes helped the students to revise;
76.14% strongly agreed or agreed.
12.5% strongly disagreed or disagreed.
The quizzes helped the students to identify areas which they understood well;
71.60% strongly agreed or agreed.
6.82% strongly disagreed or disagreed.
The quizzes helped the students to identify areas they needed to improve their understanding;
81.82% strongly agreed or agreed.
6.82% strongly disagreed or disagreed.
The quizzes were pitched at an appropriate level in relation to students’ stage of learning;
82.96% strongly agreed or agreed.
3.41% strongly disagreed or disagreed.
Key messages – Overwhelmingly, students identified that they found the Turning point quizzes helped them; in their study of medicine, identify their strengths and weaknesses, and to gauge the depth of understanding required on a given topic. The overriding drawback of the quizzes was the temperamental nature of Turning Point itself.